Saint of the Day, April 9

St. Waldetrudis

Also known as Waltrude or Waudru, she was the daughter of Saints Walbert and Bertilia and sister of St. Aldegunus of Maubeuge. Marrying St. Vincent Madelgarius, she became the mother of saints Landericus, Madalberta, Adeltrudis, and Dentelin. When her husband chose to become a  monk about 643 in the monastery of Hautrnont, France, he had founded, she established a convent at Chateaulieu, around which grew up the town of Mons, Belgium.

http://www.catholic.org/saints/saint.php?saint_id=2025

Saint of the day, April 8

Saint of the Day, April 8

(July 12, 1751 – April 8, 1816)

Saint Julie Billiart’s Story

Born in Cuvilly, France, into a family of well-to-do farmers, young Marie Rose Julie Billiart showed an early interest in religion and in helping the sick and poor. Though the first years of her life were relatively peaceful and uncomplicated, Julie had to take up manual work as a young teen when her family lost its money. However, she spent her spare time teaching catechism to young people and to the farm laborers.

A mysterious illness overtook her when she was about 30. Witnessing an attempt to wound or even kill her father, Julie was paralyzed and became a complete invalid. For the next two decades, she continued to teach catechism lessons from her bed, offered spiritual advice, and attracted visitors who had heard of her holiness.

When the French Revolution broke out in 1789, revolutionary forces became aware of her allegiance to fugitive priests. With the help of friends, she was smuggled out of Cuvilly in a haycart. She then spent several years hiding in Compiegne, being moved from house to house despite her growing physical pain. She even lost the power of speech for a time.

But this period also proved to be a fruitful spiritual time for Julie. It was at this time she had a vision in which she saw Calvary surrounded by women in religious habits and heard a voice saying, “Behold these spiritual daughters whom I give you in an institute marked by the cross.”

As time passed and Julie continued her mobile life, she made the acquaintance of an aristocratic woman, Françoise Blin de Bourdon, who shared Julie’s interest in teaching the faith. In 1803, the two women began the Institute of Notre Dame, which was dedicated to the education of the poor, young Christian girls, and the training of catechists. The following year, the first Sisters of Notre Dame made their vows. That was the same year that Julie recovered from the illness: She was able to walk for the first time in 22 years.

Though Julie had always been attentive to the special needs of the poor and that always remained her priority, she also became aware that other classes in society needed Christian instruction. From the founding of the Sisters of Notre Dame until her death, Julie was on the road, opening a variety of schools in France and Belgium that served the poor and the wealthy, vocational groups, teachers. Ultimately, Julie and Françoise moved the motherhouse to Namur, Belgium.

Julie died there in 1816. She was canonized in 1969.


Reflection

Julie’s immobility in no way impeded her activities. In spite of her suffering, she managed to co-found a teaching order that tended to the needs of both the poor and the well-to-do. Each of us has limitations, but the worst malady any of us can suffer is the spiritual paralysis that keeps us from doing God’s work on earth.

Saint Julie Billiart

Remember to Forget the Frock

This movement encourages people to donate money to a charity of their choice by buying a t-shirt and wearing it to church on Easter Sunday instead of buying a fancy outfit.

If your chosen charity doesn’t sell t-shirts, donate them money and create a poster to display at the church. If you still want to dress up, do so, and bring your charity’s t-shirt or banner to display with others.

Join us in making Easter a celebration of giving and highlighting your favorite charity and stay for the Easter Egg Hunt immediately after the service! Please, share with your friends!

http://www.forgetthefrock.org/

https://www.facebook.com/events/419980331671097/

Updates to Website


Friends, we are in the process of updating our website to make sure it is accurate, informative, and appealing. Please click the link below to check it out! Let us know your comments, both compliments and complaints. Also please inform us of any corrections that need to be made. Before a newcomer steps foot into our church they are most likely checking us out online, so let’s work together to ensure we’re putting our best foot forward​!

stjohnscorbin.org